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Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera
Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera

Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL Vintage SLR 35mm Film Camera

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Sale price
$85.00
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Vintage 1960's Mamiya/Sekor 500 DTL  35mm film camera. A bit more advanced, an excellent camera for a collector or for a beginner looking to learn more about camera history and how to use a vintage camera. Great for landscape shots using a tripod! Excellent condition, well taken care of. Light meter works. 

Tested and in working condition.

Lens: Auto Mamiya/Sekor 1:2 // 50mm // F-stop 2-16

ASA:  12-3200

Lens and case included!

Batteries not included. Tripod not included. 

History:

 

Mamiya 500 DTL  is sturdy and functional, and also happens to be the world's first camera with dual-pattern through-the-lens (TTL) metering.

The DTL dual-metering models introduced a switch beside the lens mount which allowed the photographer to select between an averaging meter pattern and a "spot" meter (actually a square area marked at the bottom of the viewfinder), with a viewfinder indication of the mode selected. This was a unique innovation for its day which was protected by U.S. Patent. Interestingly, the single metering mode offered by the TL models was the "spot" mode, not the averaging mode one might expect. Thus it was the Mamiya TL and not Pentax who implemented the original meaning of Pentax's Spotmatic brand.

As with other SLRs of the era, these cameras had no linkage between the light meter circuit and the f/stop selected; thus the lens needed to be stopped down to shooting aperture in order to take an accurate exposure reading. But it may be less than obvious at first glance how one is intended to activate the meter on a TL/DTL body. Mamiya made an interesting choice to have the film-wind lever also double as the stop-down lever and meter switch. The user pulls the lever away from the body until it clicks; after which, pressing the lever inwards against spring pressure stops down the lens and activates the meter circuit. To put the camera away without risking accidentally draining the single 1.5v silver-oxide meter battery, one stows the wind lever in its "off" position by clicking the round cap atop its axis. The switching mechanism is also unusual, instead of typical contacts the metal band around the battery is a loose fit until the wind lever is pushed inwards, at that point the band tightens around the battery to complete the circuit.